9/11 fund running out of money for those with illnesses
NEW YORK (AP) — The compensation fund for victims of 9/11 is running out of money and will cut future payments by 50 to 70 percent, officials announced Friday.
Year in space put US astronaut's disease defenses on alert
WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly a year in space put astronaut Scott Kelly's immune system on high alert and changed the activity of some of his genes compared to his Earth-bound identical twin, researchers said Friday.
Opioid maker used rap video to push powerful painkiller
BOSTON (AP) — Employees at a drug company accused of bribing doctors rapped and danced around a person dressed as a bottle of the highly addictive fentanyl spray in a video meant to motivate sales reps to push the drug.
Deadly blue 'Mexican oxy' pills take toll on US Southwest
TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — Aaron Francisco Chavez swallowed at least one of the sky blue pills at a Halloween party before falling asleep forever.
Trump gains weight, now considered obese; cholesterol down
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has put on some pounds and is now officially considered obese. The White House on Thursday released results of his most recent physical, revealing that his Body Mass Index is now 30.4.
Anesthesia, if limited, can be safe for baby's brain
Anesthesia during a short surgery doesn't harm a baby's brain development, according to an experiment involving hundreds of infants in seven countries.
Medicare ambulance rides may no longer end up at ER
WASHINGTON (AP) — Medicare wants to change how it pays for emergency ambulance services to give seniors more options besides going to a hospital emergency department, officials said Thursday.
Chemicals contaminating US water supplies focus of EPA plan
WASHINGTON (AP) — The chemical compounds are all around you. They're on many fabrics, rugs and carpets, cooking pots and pans, outdoor gear, shampoo, shaving cream, makeup and even dental floss.
Researchers find clues that depression may speed brain aging
WASHINGTON (AP) — Memory and thinking skills naturally slow with age but now scientists are peeking inside living brains to tell if depression might worsen that decline — and finding some worrisome clues.
Flu vaccine doing a relatively good job this season
NEW YORK (AP) — The flu vaccine is doing a relatively good job this season, protecting about half the people who got it, U.S. health officials said Thursday.
Cancer death racial gap narrows, but still higher for blacks
NEW YORK (AP) — For a long time, blacks have died of cancer at higher rates than other Americans. But a new report says the gap is narrowing.
53 cases of measles confirmed in southern Washington state
VANCOUVER, Wash. (AP) — Health officials in southern Washington state say they have confirmed 53 cases of measles. The Columbian reports Clark County Public Health officials have identified one new case since last week, and one previously confirmed case was ruled out from additional testing.
Source of fall romaine outbreak a mystery, US regulators say
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. food regulators say they weren't able to identify a contamination source for a food poisoning outbreak that prompted them to warn people to avoid romaine lettuce this fall .
Cleaning routine shows promise in curbing superbug infection
Think of it as decontaminating yourself. Hospitalized patients who harbor certain superbugs can cut their risk of developing full-blown infections if they swab medicated goo in their nose and use special soap and mouthwash for six months after going home, a study found.
Now's your chance to change your Medicare Advantage plan
Medicare Advantage enrollees get a new, second chance to find the right health coverage this year. The government added another enrollment window that started Jan.
8 die of measles in Ukraine this year as outbreak worsens
KIEV, Ukraine (AP) — Eight people have died of measles in Ukraine since the start of the year, already half as many as died in the whole of 2018, authorities said on Wednesday.
Keep the volume down! UN issues guidelines for audio devices
GENEVA (AP) — Two U.N. agencies want governments and makers of headphones, mobile phones and other audio devices to do more to keep down the volume they emit amid concerns about hearing loss in an increasingly digitized era.
Counseling urged to prevent depression in at-risk new moms
WASHINGTON (AP) — Doctors already are supposed to screen new mothers for depression, to find those who need prompt care. Now they're also being urged to identify women at risk — because counseling could prevent depression from setting in.
California judge will keep Planned Parenthood names sealed
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A California judge ruled Monday that the names of 14 Planned Parenthood workers and others will remain sealed during the prosecution of two anti-abortion activists charged with secretly recording them.
Utah reduces voter-backed Medicaid expansion in rare move
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Utah passed sweeping changes to a voter-approved Medicaid expansion Monday, cutting the number of people covered nearly in half and adding work requirements that the Trump administration is expected to approve.
What the FDA's actions mean for dietary supplements
NEW YORK (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration announced plans Monday to step up its policing of dietary supplements, which it said has mushroomed into a $40 billion industry with more than 50,000 products.
Youth smoking decline stalls, and vaping may be to blame
NEW YORK (AP) — Cigarette smoking rates have stopped falling among U.S. kids, and health officials believe youth vaping is responsible.
EPA decision soon on chemical compounds tied to health risks
WASHINGTON (AP) — The chemical compounds are all around you. They're on many fabrics, rugs and carpets, cooking pots and pans, outdoor gear, shampoo, shaving cream, makeup and even dental floss.
AP FACT CHECK: Trump claims he's vindicated in Russia probe
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is declaring exoneration prematurely in the Russia investigation. He's tweeting that Republican Sen.
Depression 101: Dallas schoolkids learn about mental health
DALLAS (AP) — In a scenario playing out in more and more classrooms around the world, a Dallas teenager recently asked her classmate if anything was wrong, noting that she hadn't been acting like herself.